Arcadia Publishing

About Us

As the nation’s leading publisher of books of local history and local interest, Arcadia’s mission is to connect people with their past, with their communities and with one another. Arcadia is the home of the iconic sepia-jacketed Images of America series featuring unique hyper-local histories of countless hometowns across all fifty states, as well as such series as American Palate, which focuses on local food, beer and wine, and Haunted America, which retells stories of famous hauntings, one American city and town at a time. Arcadia has an extraordinary catalog of more than 15,000 local titles and publishes 500 new books of local interest and local history each year. Using its proprietary Store Match system, Arcadia can create a highly customized hyper-local book assortment for any storefront in the nation.

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Featured Titles from Arcadia Publishing

Haunted Florida Love Stories
Wide eyes, sweaty palms and a racing heart. Are these the tell-tale marks of a love story or a haunted tale? If the story is set in Florida, there’s a good chance it’s both. From the infamous Bellamy Bridge to a haunted lighthouse in Key West, love is in the air—but it isn’t always a good thing. Author and folklorist Christopher Balzano follows lingering campus whispers and trails that vanish into the swamp to track down the urban legends and ghostly lore of Sunshine State love affairs that live on even after death.

The Haunted South
Savannah, New Orleans and St. Augustine are among the most haunted places in America, and chilling stories abound nearly everywhere below the Mason-Dixon line. At Seaman’s Bethel Theater in Mobile, Alabama, actors and staff are frightened by the unnerving sounds of a child’s laughter. The ghost of Alfred Victor DuPont, a noted ladies’ man, is said to harass female employees in the stairwell at DuPont Mansion in Louisville, Kentucky. The Café Vermilionville is housed in what is reputed to be Lafayette’s first inn. A young girl in a yellow dress, thought to be a previous owner’s daughter who died from polio around the time of the Civil War, startles patrons from the balcony of the restaurant. Join author Alan Brown as he traverses the supernatural legends of the American South.

The Lost Colony and Hatteras Island
For over 400 years, the mystery of Roanoke’s “Lost Colony” has puzzled historians and spawned conspiracies—until now. New discoveries link the lost colony of Roanoke to Hatteras Island The legend of the Lost Colony has been captivating imaginations for nearly a century. When they left Roanoke Island, where did they go? What is the meaning of the mysterious word Croatoan? In the sixteenth century, Croatoan was the name of an island to the south now known as Hatteras. Scholars have long considered the island as one of the colonists’ possible destinations, but only recently has anyone set out to prove it. Archaeologists from the University of Bristol, working with local residents through the Croatoan Archaeological Society, have uncovered tantalizing clues to the fate of the colony. Hatteras native and amateur archaeologist Scott Dawson compiles what scholars know about the Lost Colony along with what scholars have found beneath the soil of Hatteras.

Finding Daniel Boone
Finding Daniel Boone is a unique tribute to America’s frontier hero and offers closure to the greatest of all his mysteries: where he was buried. Part biography, part historical travelogue and eloquently narrated using fresh sources, rare forensic data and new field interviews, this is more than just a search for a man’s bones. Fully re-creating Daniel’s lost world, noted historian and author Ted Franklin Belue journeys along the famous Pathfinder’s last trail, from Missouri and back to Kentucky, meeting a host of colorful characters. As little has been written about Boone’s western days, where he lived the longest, this work examines the legendary woodsman’s life as much as his death.

Coney Island’s Wonder Wheel Park
The venerable Wonder Wheel, Coney Island’s oldest and greatest attraction, has dominated the Coney Island skyline for more than a century. Towering over an ephemeral amusement zone long plagued by fires, floods, and ill-conceived urban renewal schemes, the magnificent steel machine has proved to be the ultimate survivor. The ride boasts impressive statistics. A combination of roller coaster and Ferris wheel, the 150-foot-tall structure weighs 200 tons, has 16 swinging cars and 8 stationary cars, and can carry 144 riders. More than 40 million passengers have taken a ride on the wheel since it was built in 1920, and during that time, it has maintained a perfect safety record. The ride is also a monument to immigrant initiative. Charles Hermann, the ride’s designer, was Romanian; the original owner, Herman Garms, was German; and Denos Vourderis, who purchased and lovingly restored the aging landmark in 1983, was Greek. An official New York City landmark, the Wonder Wheel is now owned and operated by three generations of the Vourderis family as the centerpiece of their Deno’s Wonder Wheel Park. The enduring saga of this iconic ride, and the family that saved it, provide a captivating chapter of Coney Island’s history.

Steinway & Sons
Steinway & Sons is a unique entity in American history. Steinway is many things—an iconic piano, an American success story, a symbol of opulence, a metaphor for artistic passion, and a geographic locale. Part of the fabric of two New York City boroughs, Steinway occupies a compelling place in the minds and hearts of the millions of people, from pianists and students to artisans and salespeople, who have been impacted by the brand. From Steinway & Sons’ inception in 1853 until today, the company’s mission has stayed the same as the one German immigrant Henry E. Steinway articulated upon his arrival in America, “to build the best piano possible.” In the late 1800s, Steinway emerged as the standard-bearer in piano design and manufacturing, outshining and outlasting other brands including Chickering and Weber. Today, the Steinway piano is still built by hand in New York City according to the same stringent processes developed by Henry E. Steinway and his sons.

Francis “Two Gun” Crowley’s Killings in New York City & Long Island
On a May morning in 1931, Nassau County police officer Fred Hirsch was gunned down by the notorious New York City gangster Francis Crowley. Nicknamed “Two Gun” for tricking and murdering cops with a second loaded firearm, Crowley left a bloody trail from the Bronx to Long Island. He shot and wounded two men at a local dance hall and a New York City police detective and murdered one of Nassau County’s finest. Eventually, he was tracked to a hideout in Manhattan, where a two-hour gun battle, including more than two hundred cops and ten thousand spectators, led to his capture. His murder spree involved thousands of law enforcement personnel, stole national media attention and cut across the New York metropolitan area. Author Jerry Aylward presents the murderous life of Francis “Two Gun” Crowley from the streets of New York to the electric chair in Sing Sing.

Shark Attacks of the Jersey Shore
Every summer, thousands flock to the Jersey Shore for its beaches and boardwalks, but lurking in the depths beyond is a historic threat to tranquility. Dozens of shark attacks and interactions have occurred throughout Jersey Shore history that reveal bravery, heartbreak and the hubris of man. A boy paid a gruesome price for teasing a trapped shark in the first recorded attack in 1842. The three bloody attacks of 1960 left one man’s limb amputated. The horrific summer of 1916 included seven attacks in a two-week span and crafted the caricature of the killer shark that remains in popular culture today. Authors Patricia and Robert Heyer dive into the history of when two apex predators, man and shark, cross paths on the shores of New Jersey.

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